What is Volunteer Insurance?

Whether you run a charity, a not-for-profit, or regular live events, volunteer insurance exists to protect both you and the volunteers that work for you. From music festival ticket collectors to ongoing charity work, volunteers are often the most important part of your organisation, and they need to be protected from accidents. Volunteer Insurance will cover them for personal accidents, and they and your organisation will be at a serious disadvantage if you do not have the right coverage in place. If you want to attract the right volunteers and keep your vital volunteers safe and confident, this specific insurance is going to be an essential requirement.

Who Needs It

Many types of organisations will need to have the right volunteer insurance policy in place.  Community groups, charities that provide healthcare for the elderly or disadvantaged, religious organisations, recreation clubs, and any charity or organisation that runs events, all make use of volunteers. These workers will not be covered by a standard business insurance policy, as they are distinctly different from salaried employees. Volunteer insurance policies protect the volunteer, but they also protect the organisation from public liability claims caused by the volunteers.

Did you know?

  • There are an estimated one billion volunteer workers worldwide, and Australia has just under six million of them. (Volunteering Australia)
  • The Australian economy receives approximately $290 billion from the work carried out by volunteers. (Pro Bono Australia)
  • According to the 2016 census by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the largest volunteering demographic for men is those aged between 45-54. Women make up the largest numbers, with females aged 35-44 amounting to just under 400,000 volunteers. (Australian Bureau of Statistics)

What does it cover?

Employee insurance is very different from volunteer insurance, and you need to be aware of the protection that you are missing out on if your community group, non-profit, church, or charity makes use of volunteers. Volunteer insurance coverage means that you will get protection for:

Personal accidents: If a volunteer is injured while being involved in authorised volunteer activity, they will get protection and may receive weekly payments until they have recovered. This protects volunteers who are engaged in other work, as they may lose out on regular wages if they are injured while volunteering. It can even cover expenses caused by the accident and medical expenses.

Public liability: A well-tailored volunteer policy will also cover public liability. This type of policy will have a broader goal, and will offer protection for the organisation, any paid employees, and volunteers in cases of third-party personal injury or property damage. Not all volunteer policies will include public liability, so you need to confirm your coverage with your provider.

Voluntary Boards: If you have directors and board members that are categorised as volunteers, then you may want to include Professional Indemnity Liability. This will protect directors and officers from negligence by volunteers, defamation, slander, and sexual harassment. This is not usually included with a standard volunteer insurance policy, but may be a valuable addition if you make use of high-ranking professional volunteers.

How to create and maintain an SMB inventory list

It can take just moments for fire, flood or thieves to wipe out years of hard work, asset accumulation and stock. But it can be months before you realise the full extent of the damage – and even longer to recover – if you don’t have a detailed and up-to-date inventory list encompassing business asset including equipment, as well as stock.

It’s fairly easy to name your business’s key assets – you’ll probably think of the premises, and the tools and technology that you handle every day.

But what about those items that aren’t necessarily right in your face and that you accumulate over time? Signage, cleaning equipment and office supplies such as staplers and labelers can add up to a significant investment if they all need to be replaced at once.

Because they are not handled or used every day, it can take time to realise they were stolen or destroyed. But this doesn’t make them any less significant to the running of your business.

Not having these items can hamper your efforts to get back up and running quickly. And this – minimising the interruption to your business – is where a detailed and up-to-date office inventory list is important.

To view the full article, please visit Steadfast Well Covered here.

How to protect your business against non-compliant cladding

The UK’s Grenfell Tower disaster has had widespread implications for professionals in Australia’s construction industry. Here’s how to help protect yourself if you’re a contractor who’s worked on any Australian building project.

The UK Grenfell Tower disaster claimed the lives of 72 people on 14 June 2017.

The tragedy unfolded on television and computer screens around the globe, serving as a sharp and tragic wake-up call to governments and regulators around the world that cheap, non-compliant cladding materials could create devastating fire hazards for high rise buildings.

In Australia, the threat combustible cladding poses remains very real. As evidenced by a recent fire at an inner city high-rise in Melbourne that forced the evacuation of hundreds of residents and required more than 60 fire fighters to bring it under control.

Authorities and insurance companies have been quick to put new procedures and policies in place, including the Victorian Cladding Taskforce and NSW’s Fire Safety and External Wall Cladding Taskforce

In NSW, new laws require owners of existing buildings with combustible cladding that fall within specified categories to register their building with the NSW Cladding Registration portal by 22 February 2019.

As non-compliant buildings are identified around the nation, owners may be ordered to remove the cladding from their buildings.

This has been seen already at the Lacrosse tower building in Docklands, Melbourne, which caught fire in 2014. In turn, the apartment owners are now suing the builder and other consultants to cover the costs.

“They’ve initiated legal action against the builder and a lot of the consultants who worked on the project,”  explains Steadfast’s Broker Technical Manager, Michael White.

“Because one thing about all these kinds of situations is that anybody who had anything to do with the project, no matter how remote, can get sued.”

To view the full article, please visit Steadfast Well Covered here.

Lessons learned from Sydney’s ‘catastrophic’ storm

Sydney’s violent hailstorm, which has left millions of dollars of damage in its wake, is a crucial reminder of how important it is to protect yourself against potentially crippling damage to your business.

The incident, declared a ‘catastrophe’ by the Insurance Council of Australia, led to more than 15,000 claims in the 18 hours after it swept across Sydney and parts of the Central Coast on the evening of Thursday, December 20. It is anticipated the damage bill could reach more than $100 million.

Car dealerships, also severely hit in Sydney’s 1999 hailstorm, could submit claims to the tune of around $50 million, illustrating the extent to which small businesses can be exposed to risk and damage during extreme weather events.

“In big events like these, the resources might not be available to immediately secure a damaged roof. But it is important that it is attended to in reasonable time, and that it isn’t left for months. Because if it is, that could affect your claim”

Which is why it is vital to be proactive in mitigating your business’ loss in such situations, in order to meet your insurance obligations and return to business as usual as soon as possible.

To view the full article, please visit Steadfast Well Covered here.

Why your business needs an extreme weather action plan

Extreme weather conditions are increasing around the world, and Australia is no exception. Experts predict this summer will, again, be one of the hottest on record, with severe bushfires, storms and floods all set to increase.

In the absence of the vast resources of larger organisations, there is an urgent need for small businesses to have specific plans in place.

Preparing your property and fully understanding the risks in the event of extreme weather events, in both regional and urban areas,  such as storms, fire and cyclones is vital. However you also need an overall strategy to protect your business and its assets to ensure its survival.

Building a support network

After Cyclone Larry hit Queensland in 2006, a National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility report found businesses and individuals with strong community ties recovered better, as they relied less on overburdened government systems and their workers were less inclined to leave the area.

“Individuals, households and groups who have strong social networks are able to draw on shared material and social resources to sustain them during and through the aftermath of a cyclone,” the report said.

In both urban and rural settings, banding together during a crisis can be mutually beneficial. Having a plan for how small businesses can help each other can be the key to survival.

After the northern NSW town of Murwillumbah was ravaged by flood in 2017, locals led the recovery effort and a database of hundreds of volunteers was created to help those in need.

“Constantly we’re expecting governments and services to fix things for us,” organiser Carmen Stewart told the ABC.”I’m interested in what happens when a community is engaged first, then bringing government and services in as a partner, not as the leaders.”

Be prepared

Complacency and a failure to adapt to the increased likelihood of extreme weather is a real danger for small businesses. Research conducted by James Cook University revealed 90 per cent of cyclone-related insurance claims could be avoided through proper preparation.

Ensure you have formulated an emergency action plan for your business in the event of extreme weather, such as flooding. Educate your employees so they understand the risks and know how to react.

There are other vital proactive measures you can take. Regular maintenance on your property ensures it is as well placed as possible to handle and recover from extreme weather events. Contracting an expert to assess the structural integrity of your dwelling ensures any weak or degrading materials particularly vulnerable to damage can be repaired.

Clearing your property of refuse, such as fallen branches and bushes can help to ensure any damage severe storms can cause is limited. This includes securing outdoor items and garaging vehicles and machinery.
Read the full article on Steadfast well covered.